Startup lessons from Ramayana

Ramayana is the most important mythological literature for Hindus. It has lessons for all. No matter who you are and what you do, a thorough reading of Ramayana can grant you the wisdom that even Shakespeare would fail to provide. We have several books for the better perception of issues, but Ramayana, if absorbed has solutions to all your problems.

Startup culture is like that of a forest. You arrange your food with your hard work but sometimes somebody else comes and eats it all. Sometimes even you can get consumed as food by others. So to be sustainable at such a slippery base, you need wisdom and guidance. Nothing can be a better source than Ramayana to get what you search for.

Let’s understand Ramayana to extract some vital startup lessons.

      Also Read: Lessons your Startup can learn from a Chameleon

1. Have a clear goal and communicate it to your subordinates

have clear goals for your startup

Rama when went out to war the Asuras, he had the clear goal in his mind. He had to bring back his wife Sita who was abducted by the king of Asuras, the Ravana. Not only he knew what he was doing, but he also communicated it to the entire army of his. This motivated the whole army for the war as they wanted to rescue their mother, Sita.
This is what a startup founder should be like. A vision is what keeps a team intact.

This is what a startup founder should be like. A vision is what keeps a team intact.

2. Do not promise what you cannot deliver

do not promise what you cannot deliver. over commitment can hamper your startup

We know that the Raghukul was famous for keeping their promises. They could even die to maintain their words. This trait troubled King Dashrath a lot.
Once when Rishi Vishwamitra asked him for help, he without any thought promised him that. Then the Rishi asked him to send his sons Rama and Laxman with him to protect his sacred yajna. The king was unwilling but had to do that to keep his promise. Also, he had promised his wife Kaikeyi to fulfil two of her promises. As a result, he had to send his son Rama to the forest for 14 years. Even Ram committed to being with Sita for the whole life, but he exiled her when nobody was with her.

Once when Rishi Vishwamitra asked him for help, he without any thought promised him that. Then the Rishi asked him to send his sons Rama and Laxman with him to protect his sacred yajna. The king was unwilling but had to agree for the sake of his promise. Also, he had promised his wife Kaikeyi to fulfil two of her promises. As a result, he had to send his son Rama to the forest for 14 years. Another example is of Rama who committed to being with Sita for the whole life but exiled her when nobody was with her.

So here we learn that a startup founder should never commit to something that is hard to achieve and can result in a loss.

Also Read: Lessons to learn from Failure. time to improve

3. Be ready to sacrifice

be ready to make sacrifices for your startup

Ramayana is full of stories of sacrifices. When the purity of Sita was in doubts in Ayodhya, Rama sacrificed her for the sake of his duties. Earlier Sita was the queen to be for Ayodhya after she married Rama. When Rama was going to the forests, there wasn’t any compulsion of her accompanying him. She still left the luxurious life and went on with him for the love of her husband.

Startup founders also need to have a similar affection with their venture. They must be willing to sacrifice their comforts to evolve their startup as a brand.

4. Do not run for a golden deer; there isn’t any

ramayan teaches us that golden dear is a myth. do no get lost in illusion focus on what is important for your startup

Once when Sita saw a golden deer in the forests, she sent Rama to fetch that deer for her. She was completely obsessed with that. This incident was the sole reason for her abduction and a war between Rama and Ravana.
A startup founder in a similar way must avoid setting any unreal goal. He shouldn’t eye any shortcut. Working hard is the only way to grow your business as no golden deer exists for real.

Also Read: HOW TO VALIDATE YOUR STARTUP IDEA

5. Know your boundaries

An important lesson from ramayana is to know your boundaries

When Laxman went to look for his elder brother, he instructed Sita not to cross the protective line in any case. He created a magical protective line called Laxman Rekha. But, Ravana disguised as a beggar came and asked Sita to cross the line to offer him the alms. She crossed it and invited trouble for herself.

Even in the life of a founder, there exists a line that must never be crossed. To be sustainable in the market with changing times, never cross your limits otherwise, it’s a tough world for startups out there.

6. Optimal usage of the available resources

Ramayana teaches us how we can use the resources we have in best possible ways

Rama was on exile when Sita got abducted. He had no army to fight a battle and get back his wife. He organised the VanarSena of Sugreeva against the might of Ravana. He used what options he had to the best and won the battle.
A startup founder can get a great message from this incident. Whatever fund or resources you have, use it to the maximum potential. A founder must never sit back waiting for someone to come and invest in his startup. Make optimum use of what you have and build a startup that investors crave to bet their money at.

Also Read: 10 Top Hidden Risks in a Startup

7. Push the young guns forward

promote young talent to catalyse your startup growth

Rama was the incarnation of Lord Vishnu. He was capable enough to do everything himself and fight the battles alone, but he kept himself as a human. He gave opportunities to all his subordinates to give their contribution to the battle they fought.

Similarly, one of the prime duties of a founder or a leader is to push his subordinates for the tasks. It helps the youngsters to get the exposure, and they become better at what they do.

8. Do not let your Sentiments contain You

do not let your sentiments affect your startup decisions

The abduction of Sita was a huge setback for Rama. He was much in grief when he got separated from the women he loved. In such a painful moment he kept his cool. He organised his team and planned his proceedings.

A startup founder must never be led by his emotions. He must rise even stronger after any pitfall. A weak leader results in a weaker team.

Also Read: 7 Useful Startup Advice from Experienced Entrepreneurs

9. Ego is bad for Your Startup Health

ego is bad for your startup health

Ravana was a mighty and knowledgeable king. It was his ego that led to the verdict he met. Ego doesn’t let you think straight and deflects you from understanding the ground realities. The same way a startup founder must never have any ego. Ego blocks your reasoning and would make you burn in the fire of Dussehra.

10. Never regret your decision

never regret your startup decisions

Ravana took his decisions and always strived to make them right. Even when he died, he had no regrets, for his decisions. He rather felt obliged as he received death from the hands of Lord Rama. What’s done is done, think about making is right.

A founder should also never waste his time in the regret job. He must stand by his decisions and make them right. He should make his team believe in his decisions.

Also Read: 7 Deadly Sins every Startup Founder does

11. A startup is above its founder

your startup is more valuable then you as a founder

While the army of Rama was throwing stones in the sea to construct a bridge, they inscribed the name of Rama on those stones. The stones never drowned. While Rama threw a stone without writing anything as he thought it would float because he has thrown it. The stone drowned.

So here what we learn is that no founder is above the startup. You must expose your brand, not yourself.

So these were the top lessons what Ramayana teaches as far as a startup founder is concerned. We know the Ramayana has a lot more to offer and we here have included the lessons that are crucial for a startup.

If you have something to add to these Startup lessons from Ramayana, feel free to share.